Tuesday, January 29, 2013

FEATURED UNIVERSITY #2

Study in USA
Texas A&M University(often referred to as A&M or TAMU) is a coeducational public research university located in College Station, Texas, United States.The main campus is one of the largest in America, spanning 5,500 acres (22 km2). The university is part of the Bryan-College Station      metropolitan area located within Brazos County in the Brazos Valley (Southeast Central Texas) region, an area often referred to as "Aggieland". Ready to be an Aggie? All students assume the nickname at Texas A&M, an academic and athletic powerhouse in central Texas. Once an all-men’s school called the Agricultural and Mechanical College—now shortened to A&M—the university today is coed and has offers a wide variety of majors and activities.
 Study in USA Students can choose from more than 800 clubs and organizations, including nearly 60 fraternities and sororities.About 12 percent of students go Greek. More students, about 25 percent, play in Texas A&M intramural sports leagues, one of the largest programs in the country. The school’s varsity sports compete in the NCAA Division I Big 12 Conference, cheered on by mascot Reveille VIII, a collie. Miss Rev, as the collie is known, is also the highest-ranking member in the school’s Cadet Corps, the largest ROTC program in the nation (not including programs at service academies). First-year students interested in community service can get involved right away through the Freshmen in Service and Hosting program (FISH). All students can give back during The Big Event, the largest single-day, student-run volunteer effort in the country in which about 12,500 Aggies work to improve the nearby cities of College Station and Bryan. For many students, these communities are also home; freshmen are not required to live on campus and many choose to live in College Station or Bryan.

Monday, January 28, 2013

FEATURED UNIVERSITY #1



 Study in USA


The University of Virginia  is a public research university in Charlottesville, Virginia, United States. It was conceived and designed by U.S. President Thomas Jefferson and established in 1819. UVA is the only university in the United States to be designated a World Heritage Site by UNESCO.


Study in USA
 

University rankings
National
ARWU 56
Forbes 32
U.S. News & World Report 22
Global
ARWU 101-150
QS 126
Times 135

Founded by Thomas Jefferson, the University of Virginia is located in Charlottesville. It’s referred to among insiders as Mr. Jefferson’s University or simply The University. Only first-year students are required to live on campus, and many upperclassmen live in off-campus apartments or fraternity and sorority houses. Greek life is prominent at UVA with a membership that includes approximately 30 percent of the student body. The Cavaliers, known unofficially as Wahoos or ‘Hoos, are members of the NCAA Division I Atlantic Coast Conference and are well known for their consistently dominant men’s and women’s lacrosse teams.
UVA’s graduate programs include the highly ranked Darden Graduate School of Business Administration, Curry School of Education, School of Engineering and Applied Science, School of Law, and School of Medicine. UVA houses one of the 25 remaining original copies of the Declaration of Independence, called a Dunlap Broadside, in its Albert and Shirley Small Special Collections Library. The school also has its own distinct lingo: The campus is referred to as the "grounds," the central quad is the "lawn," and students are either a first, second, third, or fourth year. Former U.S. Senator Edward Kennedy, national news anchor Katie Couric, and former NFL player Tiki Barber all earned degrees from UVA. Famous writer Edgar Allen Poe was forced to leave the school after losing his tuition money to gambling, but his dorm room on the lawn is still preserved and on display for visitors.
Study in USA
One of the most beautiful college campus of USA

Sunday, January 27, 2013

MOST BEAUTIFUL COLLEGE CAMPUSES #1

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, N.C.

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, N.C.

University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Va.

University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Va.

University of Washington, Seattle, Wash.

University of Washington, Seattle, Wash.

Furman University, Greenville, S.C.

Furman University, Greenville, S.C.

Florida Southern College, Lakeland, Fla.

Florida Southern College, Lakeland, Fla.

FREE GRE RETEST (FAQs)

 1. Why am I being offered a free retest?
The GRE Program has recently implemented another review process of individual
test performance for the computer-based GRE General Test Verbal and Quantitative
sections. The purpose of the process is to analyze each test taker’s performance data
to determine if the test presented to the individual was an appropriate selection of test
questions by the computer. It appears that in a very small number of cases, the
computer algorithm may not have functioned as effectively as intended. As a result,
ETS® is offering these test-takers the option of taking a free retest on the affected
section only. In this optional retest effort, the GRE® Program is attempting to be as
fair as possible to all examinees.

2. Why was my score identified as possibly being affected?
There are multiple conditions that operate when the computer algorithm selects test
questions for the Verbal and Quantitative sections. Among these conditions are the
selection of various item types and the selection of differing content. In addition to
these conditions, the computer-adaptive algorithm considers the examinee’s
performance on the previous questions and the statistical properties of the questions.
On your test, it appears that the computer algorithm may have selected a more limited
range of test questions than is desirable; no other part of the General Test was
affected. Because you may have experienced this irregularity, we are offering you a
free retest of the affected section.

3. How can I know whether it is to my advantage to retest?
There is no way to predict what might happen to your score. If you choose to retest,
your score can go up, down, or remain the same.

4. What if I do not want to retest?
If you decide not to retest, your original score will remain on your testing record.

5. If I take the free retest, can I take all the test sections again?
No. A free retest voucher is being provided to you for the affected section only. If you
retake more than the affected section, official scores for those additional sections will
not be reported to you or to your designated score recipients.

6. Since I will be taking only the affected section again, what do I have to do when I
begin the test?

After you go through the general directions, you will see a screen on which you can
select the section(s) to retake. You should select only the section(s) listed on your
voucher.

7. If I mistakenly select two test sections at the test center when I have been
approved for only one test section, what should I do?

Please contact the test administrator.

8. I’ve decided to retest but am unable to schedule a retest in time to meet
application/fellowship deadlines. What should I do?

If you are in the United States, U.S. Territories or Canada, contact the GRE Program
toll free at 1-866-473-4373 Monday - Friday 8:00 a.m. - 7:45 p.m. Eastern Time for
assistance. For all other locations, contact the GRE Program at 1-609-771-7670 or
gre-info@ets.org.
If you need to expedite the score reporting process in order to meet deadlines, inform
your designated score recipients that they can contact the GRE Program at 1-609-683-
2002 to obtain your retest score.

9. How and when will my original and retest scores be reported?
The scores from your original test were reported to the institutions that you requested
through the standard reporting process. If you take the free retest, the retest score for
the affected section will REPLACE the original score on your permanent record. A
revised score report will be sent to you and your designated score recipients within 10-
15 days after testing. If a department to which you are applying needs the score sooner,
the department can contact the GRE Program at 1-609-683-2002 or gretests@ets.org.

10. What are score recipients told about my scores?
Your scores on the test you recently took were sent to your designated score recipients
as part of the regular GRE score reporting process. If you decide to retest, your
designated score recipients will be informed about the retest when the retest score for
the affected section is sent to them. The designated score recipients will be advised to
replace the original score on the affected section with the retest score. If you decide not
to retest, no additional communication will be sent to your designated score recipients.

11. How long will the voucher be valid? What happens if I cancel and reschedule?
The free retest voucher is valid for six months. If you need to cancel an appointment for
a retest, follow the appointment cancellation instructions on page 7 of the GRE
Information and Registration Bulletin. All testing policies in the GRE Bulletin are in
effect for the retest. To get a copy of the GRE Bulletin, download it at
ets.org/gre/stupubs or contact the GRE Program at 1-609-771-7670 or 1-866-473-4373